“Blinding lights of PR-success can be very harmful”

BLINDING LIGHTS OF
PR-SUCCESS CAN BE VERY HARMFUL

SOFIA TCHKONIA ON THE GEORGIAN FASHION INDUSTRY

by Natela Potskhveriya

Sofia Tchkonia has been a driving force of the Georgian fashion industry since her very first initiative — contest for the young talents called BeNext. Five years ago she launched Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tbilisi and 11 seasons later made it digital — closed borders due to pandemic made digitalization quicker. After the first online fashion week was over, we talked to Tchkonia about the biggest challenges she faced and which way she thinks the industry should move on.

 

Was it easy to digitize the fashion week? You have launched the platform within a couple of months, right? 
To be honest, that was a huge challenge. I got to see our industry from so many new unexpected sides. Some of our designers proved how creative and hard-working they are, despite all the circumstances. Of course, there were some disappointments, but I still think it has more positive impact rather than negative. 

What positive impact do you see? 
First, I believe that more people actually saw the shows. More potential clients and buyers. Those who never came to Tbilisi. Second, we had viewers from very unexpected countries like Egypt. We didn’t even know people there had any interest in Georgian fashion. I could also see which countries prefer which designers. For example, we had a lot of viewers of Lado Bokuchava’s show in one European country. It means that he might use this information and find a retailer there. We have later transferred all this information to designers. Hope they will use it. I can’t control that.

 

What about the Middle East? Is Georgian fashion popular there? I can say from IERI’s side, we have some good requests from that part of the world.   
Extremely popular! Kuwait, Dubai — they watched every show. If I had my brand, I would think of targeting Middle Eastern audiences and potential clients. Looks like the interest is all there. We even got a request on opening a pop-up in Egypt. 
Though, I have noticed that some designers don’t use analytics, don’t work with commercial data, with clients reviews and comments. They have this ideal picture of Dover Street Market or other “cool” retailers, which might be very good imagewise, but might be totally unhelpful from the business side. Building business properly is no less important than having creative breakthroughs. I wish more designers could have proper knowledge on brand management.   

What about your new project — Georgian Fashion Foundation? Isn’t sharing knowledge one of its missions?
RIght. The name, social networks and the official manifesto are new, but my team and I have been doing a lot for the industry for the past 15 years — more than 150 projects, including BeNext Competition, exhibitions in Paris and so much more. The Foundation shall work with designers and support them — search for grants, investors, sponsors. Do PR and advise on marketing strategies. Not only designers shall we support, I mean the whole creative industry. We invited famous journalists, professors, teachers, mentors to join our Advisory Board, and they were all so excited and inspired. We have CFDA representatives on board, the Polimoda team and many more. People are joining with pleasure.  
Later we shall launch online courses and online lectures for designers and professionals, and after that, when the world gets better, we shall start the grants programme and announce official school opening. 

Sounds very ambitious. But why would international supervisors and professionals support Georgian industry, if their own industry is also suffering? 
Well, in Italy, for example, fashion and design is a part of economics, it’s supported by the government, and brands as well as retailers are key players of what is called the financial environment. In The USA there is CFDA — a Foundation run by Anna Wintour and Tom Ford, and you have probably heard that they have announced financial support to some designers. In Georgia the process is way different. Our designers get very small support from the authorities and there has not been any kind of Foundation, like CFDA. Also, we are not asking international advisors to support our designers financially. What we want them to do, is to share knowledge on how the business should be built or maintained, give their audit to the brands and some up with the analysis of the most weak points. Thanks to my experience and networking, all these people, who are on the advisory board, love Georgia and are willing to share any kind of knowledge. Also PR is so important. I have made a huge research on the industry abilities, and there is always someone in search of new and fresh talents. Why don’t we tell them about Georgian talents. Having a foundation like Georgian Fashion Foundation will make the match-finding process easier.

Like Fashion Tinder? 
In a way. I believe that Georgian fashion is an underrated investment opportunity. Those who will correctly evaluate these opportunities will get benefits very quickly. Mark my words.

 

And what about young talents and those smart kids who graduate from the Universities? Will they somehow benefit from the Foundation? 
Well, you know we used to make internships for the graduates in big fashion brands, but then we had to cancel that. We got very poor feedback on our students abilities, which was very upsetting for me personally. That’s why I decided to go deeper and start working on the Fashion School in Tbilisi. We are now in the process of building the educational plan, negotiating with professors and so on. Also we work a lot with the Academy of Arts, with Nino Mgaloblishvili, who is a passionate enthusiast, and I respect her a lot. We hope that we shall open our online School as soon as possible. The real one to follow in a year or so. We are glad to share our networking, our experience, our knowledge. Hope to see keen interest from the side of students. But that’s a different topic.

 

There is one question that has been bothering me for a long time. So many Georgian designers are following this trash aesthetics, do you think that’s a correct way of presenting Georgian brands? 
To be honest, that’s my huge pain. Several seasons ago ugly fashion and trash aesthetics were trendy. But now people are searching for beauty, they want fresh and pure pictures, beautiful garments on them and clean, nude faces. Trash is totally out. I think they should think of changing their visual language. This question of what is cool and what is not has been our stumbling block with so many designers. We have talents who don’t want to be featured in Vogue, because they think it’s “not cool”, and they are dreaming of Dazed and their whole concept is built around being one day featured in Dazed. Which is not bad at all, but there should also be money-making opportunities. You need to buy fabrics for the next collection, pay your workers. 

Exactly. That was my next question. You are saying about PR-success which, we all know, is not the same as financial success. Would you agree that in some cases PR-success is bigger than the brand can actually handle?   
Blinding lights of PR-success can be very harmful. I never told anyone, but when we started out our fashion week 5 years ago, I had to pay some journalists so that they would come to Tbilisi and write about Georgian collections. Now I said that. Not to promote myself, but to underline how things actually work in the industry. That’s why our Foundation shall work on business education promotion on an equal basis with sponsorships and grants. Just giving a scholarship or sponsorship is harmful. We need to educate the industry.

david_koma_qa-01

David Koma answering your questions

DAVID KOMA

ANSWERING YOUR QUESTIONS

by our beloved readers & clients

We love making personal and touching content and asked David Komakhidze, creative mind behind David Koma, to answer the questions from IERI’s readers and clients. The readers turned out to be no less creative than David himself, and sent their questions in the most unusual way. David accepted the challenge! And here is the final result!

The article below is way too creative, so it might take time to load all the pictures. Watch this video of David and give this page one extra minute to fully load.

#1

Are you doing what you truly want to do?

#2

#3

David, what is your favorite cuisine — Indian, or Panasian one?

#4

#5

What was the best experience last time you visited Tbilisi?

#6

IRINA SHAMUGIA

What part of your life does the fashion industry occupy?

#7

If you were a colour, which one would you be? 

#8

#9

Hello! Do you believe that trends like sustainability and transparency in the fashion industry will win over capitalistic values of humanity?

#10

#11

Tell us about summer collection 2020 inspiration. 

#12

#13

Is it possible to get the attention of David Koma for a start-up designer? If yes, how? And perhaps I can get advice about my ideas.  

#14

#15

What advice would you give to beginners who are intrested in fashion?

#16

How should they develop themselves in this competitive industry?

#17

#18

What makes you happy?

#19

#20

How do you relax your mind?

#21

IERI RECOMMENDS:

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST:

EXPLORING TIKO PAKSA'S INSPIRATION

by Salome Jakeli

Architectural and airy pieces by Tiko Paksa have always been our big love. Her collections always showcase different forms and shapes with interesting geometric patterns, which reminded us of architectural sights and monuments. In our exclusive  IERI video-interview Tiko took us on a journey of becoming a successful and independent designer, but today we asked her to share her vision and name her main sources of inspiration.

Where do you find inspiration?

Inspiration is everywhere — from the words of your favorite writer to the blooms and leaves on your morning walk. You just need to open your eyes and breathe it in. Every detail is important in what we can see or feel, everything has its own aesthetics and characteristic features. Architecture has always played a key role in our life, part of our culture, how we see the world.

Tiko Paksa SS19

Tell us about your favorite style of architecture

There are many architects whose aesthetics and approach to the world are interesting and influential for me. For example Le Corbusier with his modern architecture, a unique mix of modern “BOSCO VERTICALE” by Stefano Boeri, Tadao Ando’s minimalistic aesthetic in architecture, and breaking rules. And my all-time favorite and influential architect Zaha Hadid.

Le Corbusier

Tadao Ando

“BOSCO VERTICALE” Stefano Boeri

What is your favorite city in the world?

Every city has a story. It already means that this story will be interesting, it is difficult to choose a favorite city, I like travelling and learning new stories of new cities. One of the sources of inspiration in my work is discoveries that are often associated with travelling to new cities. Maybe Tbilisi is my favorite, I don’t know, I can’t single it out.

Is there any architectural sight you would love to see with your own eyes?

I would like to see Zaha Hadid Architects’ Danjiang Bridge in Taiwan. The world’s longest single-mast, asymmetric cable-stayed bridge. The bridge seeks to minimize its visual impact by using a single concrete mast. Somehow, it creates simple harmony on earth in my imagination, the bridge goes in the future.

Danjiang Bridge in Taiwan — Zaha Hadid

How would you describe your perfect home?

My perfect home looks like Tbilisi. Its influence, strength, diversity, time passing dynamics are the bearers of a huge history. I think I could walk the streets of Tbilisi all day, every day and never get bored. Some sections of Tbilisi are lined with classical European facades, grand enough to rival any Parisian boulevard. The most important thing in Tbilisi, what I love about it, is the cozy atmosphere from the inside. If you go through inside you never forget the filling, smell or visual impact

What are your thoughts on the architectural culture of Tbilisi? Do you have your top-5 fav buildings in Tbilisi?

There are several buildings that I like in Tbilisi, in my opinion, one of the most interesting periods for city architecture is the Soviet period. Buildings that play an important role in the urban and architectural look of the city. One of my favorites is the Ministry of Transportation, one of the most well-known Soviet masterpieces of the capital, another one is Former editorial office of the Zarya Vostoka newspaper.  Expo Georgia Area is one of my perfect destinations in the city. It used to exhibit industrial and agricultural achievements of the Soviet Republic.

Tbilisi – ex Ministry of Transportation. now bank of Georgia

expo Georgia

IERI RECOMMENDS:

Crosty team playlist

CROSTY TEAM PLAYLIST

MUSIC FOR TOUGH TIMES

by Salome Jakeli

George Mikaia, creative director of Crosty sneakers brand, knows a lot about tough times. Being raised in war-torn Georgia, he has his own list of priorities and the main one — is freedom. We asked George to make a playlist of encouraging tracks and share his thoughts on success, future of fashion and challenges we are all facing today. In the end we created a Crosty Mixtape, afterall mixtapes are like pictures but with sound.

Crosty — is a designer sneakers brand born and made in Georgia. The signature sign is a word “freedom” — tavisupleba — written in Georgian right on the top of almost every shoe. Their sneakers were worn by famous athletes and other celebrities around the globe. In an exclusive IERI video interview George told us about his challenging journey to success.

WHAT IS SUCCESS TO YOU?

Success means the accomplishment of your self-defined goals. Success is my team — to me the main accomplishment is CROSTY team. I am truly proud of us. All of us are united by the idea of freedom, for which we keep on fighting every day.
One of my favorite quotes that I base success on is: ‘I have learned not to measure a man by his success in life, but by the obstacles, he has overcome while trying to succeed.” Booker T. Washington.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE IN THE WORLD?

My favorite place in the world is untouched massive snowy mountains. Silence and a lot of snow. It’s the place where you feel yourself free, where you stay alone with yourself. All emotions, I’ve got here, are a source of inspiration reflected in my creations. Items that tell you the story of my freedom.

WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE FUTURE OF FASHION?

I think the future of fashion looks like a cocktail mix. Different styles combined and mixed with each other. The balance between cutting-edge design and natural human expression. Where it’s about being continually in conversation. I think interesting niche brands with true stories, middle size communities, and pop-up stores will be more relevant in the future, and of course e-commerce and e-fashion.

HOW ARE YOU DIFFERENT NOW THAN YOU WERE, SAY, FIVE YEARS AGO?

I feel the difference in everything. The way of thinking, and the confidence in what I do. Only one thing has not changed – my desire to create something global.

DOES CRITICISM EVER ILLUMINATE ANYTHING FOR YOU ABOUT YOUR OWN WORK?

People sometimes criticize what they do not understand, and it takes time. First, when you criticize another’s ideas, you need to tap into your creative mind as deeply as possible. I am trying to analyze the criticism of competent people and turn them into a benefit. Here the balance is important.

HOW DO YOU CHALLENGE YOURSELF?

I challenge myself with impossible goals. It motivates me and gives me energy for moving forward. Big goals – Big results.

DID YOU EVER HAVE A MENTOR OR SOMEONE TO GUIDE YOU?

I think that the mentor is important in everything. I have a mentor in the business side, and I’m in the process of finding a mentor in fashion as well.

WHAT WOULD YOU CONSIDER A PERFECT DAY — FROM THE TIME YOU RISE TO THE TIME YOU FALL ASLEEP?

The perfect day starts from morning running, 10-minute meditation session, reading some industry news, going to work and during the day doing something that brings us a little closer to our goal. After that, spending time with friends and family.
The main motto of a perfect day is to feel free and do what pleases me.

WHAT DO YOU DO OR TURN TO KEEP YOURSELF GROWING AND CHANGING AND EVOLVING

First of all, I explore myself. Why do I make this or that decision, how do I react to different things. I’m trying different things to find weaknesses and develop them. I know where I want to be in a few years, on this basis, I try to develop myself in this direction.

DO YOU BELIEVE IN ASTROLOGY?

I didn’t believe in astrology before, but after I began to apply and test various instruments of astrology in my life, and some of them really work. It’s impossible to ignore. I’m still studying this science, but now I can say that I believe in astrology.

WHAT INTERESTS YOU OUTSIDE OF FASHION?

First of all – snowboarding. I’m interested in graphic design, art, and minimalistic architecture, retro car designs. And everything connected to freedom.

IS THERE ANY ADVICE YOU CAN GIVE A YOUNG DESIGNER?

If you can do something to get somebody excited – not everybody – but if you can be the best for somebody, then you can win. Start with what you have, and learn — absorb all the information like a sponge. Mistakes are not the end, it is important to learn how to fix them.

WHERE DID THE BRAND NAME COME FROM?

In the early stages, designing the first prototype, we were experimenting with a crocodile texture. We combined ‘croco’ and ‘style’ and came up with ‘Crosty. ‘ Later we dropped the Crocodile texture, however we liked the sound of the name and kept it.

WHAT’S ONE SONG THAT’S GOTTEN YOU THROUGH A TOUGH TIME?

IERI RECOMMENDS

A girl behind LIYA brand

A GIRL BEHIND LIYA BRAND

LIYA GOGLIDZE'S PHOTO ALBUM

by Salome Jakeli

The brand Liya was founded back in 2017, which in the fashion industry chronology means that it’s quite young. But in this short period of time the brand managed to find its strong identity and loyal customers from around the world. Liya Goglidze, the designer behind the brand, doesn’t like to show her face, but her vision is so fascinating, that we actually asked her to create her own scrapbook for IERI. Every photo has a story, telling readers what obstacles she Goglidze confronted as a designer or how she defines beauty.

When you started, who was your ideal of fashion and beauty?

There was never a definite ideal of beauty that I concentrated on. Having said that I am a huge fan of Hollywood’s golden era of cinema. Mostly absolutely obsessed with Katharine Hepburn’s beauty and her style. With her being named as lady of menswear. For the way she used to style herself by wearing “men shape” clothing which didn’t hide her femininity but enhanced it and made her stand out of the crowd.

Tell us about the beginning of LIYA brand

The beginning was a long time in the making. First as an idea which was brewing for several years. It was only when our co-founder Anna Mchedlishvili planned how and where to start. Thanks to her, the whole process became a reality. I think it takes definitely more than one person to build up a vision. She navigated and turned all my sketches into reality.

How are you different now than you were, say, five years ago?

It seems world’s apart for the past three years. We realized how much we’ve learned but how much there is still to learn. That is the beauty of it. It is a never ending process of learning and creating.

How do you challenge yourself?

By never being satisfied with what you’ve done. There is always more and better to do. By constantly sketching the ideas and educating myself on the subjects I have absolutely no knowledge on. It shouldn’t be just about fashion because fashion is itself not about just clothing. Being curious is the best way to challenge myself.

What do you think is the future of fashion?

The future of fashion goes hand in hand with the future of humanity, meaning digitalised. I would call it digitised fantasies. I am very excited about it, I think new technological innovations will and already are absolutely changing the approach of creativity and its reflection onto reality.

When you see the final product, are you satisfied and pleased?

It is always a pleasurable torture! Never being fully satisfied. When we start shooting the new collection I am already into the development of the new one. It’s a beautiful race where I enjoy the ride.

How would you define beauty?

Beauty is a fluid concept changing its shape and meaning with time and from person to person. I don’t define it. I think it is rather felt through your individuality.

If you have to organize a dinner: If you could have four guests, who would they be? The guests can be anybody—even Marilyn Monroe

My dinner guests would be: Ernest Hemingway, J.R.R Tolkien, Stephen Hawking, Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill.

If you were to describe yourself to somebody who didn’t know how to find you in a crowd, how would you describe yourself?

Dressed all black, wearing sneakers, long dark hair, big dark shades.

Describe an ideal Liya customer

Anyone is an ideal Liya customer as long as she/he feels that way. I don’t put my customer in any box and set limits.

What is success to you?

Success is a tricky thing. I think you feel it just for a second, when you have accomplished your goal and then the next second you are already back to new goals, struggle and hard work.

Did you ever have a mentor or someone to guide you?

I would rather call it the support system and my greatest motivators — would definitely be my family. People who I trust the most and who are there every step of the way.

What is your favorite city in the world, not necessarily to live but to see?

Any Italian city! Especially any city in Puglia, Tuscany, Calabria!!!

Do you think you are difficult to work with?

Maybe, depends, I guess. But I don’t think that being comfortable leads to any good results. We have to challenge each other, motivate and question. Come out of our comfort zone to achieve and move forward.

What are some of the obstacles you’ve confronted as a designer?

There are so many: always out of time; realizing that you are part of the industry and there are rules applied to it; challenging to create with limited supplies, thus not always being able to fully realize your vision….

What are the moments when you feel the most joy/happiest?

With family, with friends over dinner, in my atelier working, traveling for work and pleasure. Especially now when I know that all those people are healthy and safe-that all makes me especially happy.

IERI RECOMMENDS:

Ketevane Maissaia On Her Road To Success

«MY FIRST INTERNSHIP WAS FOR ALEXANDER MCQUEEN»

KETEVANE MAISSAIA, CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF LE MOCASSIN ZIPPE, ON HER ROAD TO SUCCESS

by Anka Tsitsishvili
«MY FIRST INTERNSHIP WAS FOR ALEXANDER MCQUEEN»

KETEVANE MAISSAIA, CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF LE MOCASSIN ZIPPE, ON HER ROAD TO SUCCESS

by Anka Tsitsishvili

Almost every fashion enthusiast’s dream is to work for a big fashion house like Hermes, Bottega Venetta,  Alexander McQueen, Loewe — even one internship at any of those could play a life changing part. But if you did it all, then you might expect the whole world to be at your feet. Anybody would, of course. But not Ketevane Maissaia. She is probably one of the most humble people in the Georgian fashion industry and definitely not the kind of braggart who boasts of her experience and network capital. Though what she actually has done — using all the knowledge she has gained within all these years of work at big houses, she established her own mono product brand – Le Mocassin Zippe 

Coming from a small country like Georgia, where the fashion industry is still in the establishment process, it sounds almost impossible to get an internship at Hermes or Maison Martin Margiela. But there she is — Ketevane Maissaia, who has made it just using her creativity and working hard.

Creative director of IERI store, Anka Tsitsishvili, talked with Ketevave on her internships and asked the questions we all wanted to know, like did she meet Lee McQueen himself and was she able to work with Martin Margiela himself. The video is in Georgian, but below we have prepared a full transcription for our English Speaking readers.

ANKA: Tell us about you and your brand..

KETEVANE: It’s been 7 years since I established my brand. I left Georgia 15 years ago to get an education abroad and then I decided to stay in Europe and work there. I always wanted my work to be connected to Georgia. As you may know, there is a traditional way of shoe-making in Georgia. My dream was to find a developed field and take it outside Georgia. That is why I decided to choose a classic mocassin shoe as my monoproduct. We import all the required materials from abroad and produce a shoe itself in Georgia. At first my main focus was a good quality European leather, but today I am trying to choose eco-friendly materials. Producing a good quality leather is quite damaging to our environment.

ANKA: Your latest presentation was about planting the trees, how did you come up with this idea? The IERI team was very honoured to become a part of your project.

KETEVANE: Generally, whenever I work on a new project, I try to choose a subject that is close to my heart. In this case I was very concerned about the overall global situation: so many forests were on fire and also a very polluted air in Georgia. A lot of people could participate in the tree planting process and we did it all together.

IERI store has partnered together with Ketevane to plant trees on the territory of the University Library in Maglivi as a part of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tbilisi new collection presentation. Apart from trees being planted, all the guests had an opportunity to tie a colored ribbon to a Wishing Tree (IERI’s Natvris Khe) and make a wish due to an old Georgian tradition. The Wishing tree is still kept securely in the flagship-store at Wine Factory N1. This is not the only environmental activity made by IERI store and executive company Heritage — the story on other activities is to come

ANKA: Tell me, when did you realize you were interested in fashion?

KETEVANE: I don’t remember an exact moment, but I was always fascinated by this industry. Back then fashion was in an early stage of development in Georgia. My parents were artists and maybe that also played a certain role. My mother is a painter, she also worked as a costume designer in films. My father is  an architect, so basically I was around creators. I think that is what I am good at and love to do. 

ANKA: Where did you study and when did you choose accessories design as your priority?

KETEVANE: At first I designed clothes as well, but then there was a very dramatic period in my life. I did a one year internship at Hussein Chalayan, after which I got a job offer from the brand. Unfortunately I had to decline the offer, because I was not able to make documents. I had to go back to school and that is when I decided to change my major to accessories design. After graduation I quickly found a job at Hermes and then I followed the flow. 

ANKA: How did you start your job at Hermes? It must be incredible to be working for a brand with such a rich heritage…

KETEVANE: It is also quite an interesting story. Generally, some brand representatives always attend the graduation ceremonies. On my graduation Hermes brand representative was late for my speech and missed my presentation. Because of that, I decided to send her my work personally, she could not deny it and even offered me an assistant’s job in the bag design team.

ANKA: What other brands you worked for? If I remember correctly it was Alexander Mcqueen. 

KETEVANE: Yes, my first internship was for Lee, for my freshman year. I did not know who to contact when I was looking for a job. I had a big book about the designers and on the last page it had all the emails. I chose the brands that I was most interested in and started sending out emails. Only one brand  replied and offered me a job, it was Alexander Mcqueen.  

ANKA: When did you establish your brand and how did you come up with the idea?

KETEVANE: When I left Margiel’s studio, where I worked for accessories as well, I was pregnant and wanted to take some time off, because working in the fashion industry is super tiring both physically and morally. So I wanted to peacefully spend my pregnancy and the early years of my child. That is exactly when I started my brand, I had both space and time to think. But I quickly realised that I had to go back to work, because it is really hard to survive with only such a small brand. Back then the fashion industry was super strict and for small brands it was hard to withstand. 

ANKA: What was the inspiration behind Le Mocassin Zippe?

KETEVANE: My project was about the procession of time, I always think about our present time and not only me, I have heard a lot of people think the same. The past and the future is in our memories and dreams, but the present time goes on constantly. I connected this constant movement to the melting process. I created a red suit, a red because it is a lively color. The suit instead of the stiches had zippers, then I froze this model and connected it to the melting project. It was very emotional for me.
WATCH THE PROJECT VIDEO

ANKA: How did you start a job at Loewe?

KETEVANE: I was already planning to leave Paris and come back to Georgia, but one day a woman visited my showroom, which I had met  at my graduation. She asked me if by chance I was looking for a job. I confirmed and it  turned out she was looking for a candidate for a job at Loewe. I spent very good and productive years at the company, it was my first time that I got to work with a group of such professionals. 

ANKA: What is your main motivation? 

KETEVANE: Maybe, the desire to constantly do something. I am a very creative person and I want to always create something. Working a calm schedule is really hard for me. In our present circumstances I try to workout, read and so on.  

ANKA: What is your dream and what you consider as your biggest success?

KETEVANE: In my mind there is not a peak, the most important part is to enjoy the process. My main dream would be to do the same job in my country, Georgia, but on a bigger scale. I want to establish a fashion house, which will unify a bunch of Georgian designers. Really hope that I will be able to accomplish this dream. 

ANKA: What advice would you give to the designers, which are just starting out?

KETEVANE: The most important thing is to believe in yourself and your vision till the end and not to be afraid of the doubters. It is also crucial to educate yourself in the aspect of arts and culture, and to always be up to date about the fashion industry news and to use this knowledge to demonstrate your vision. 

Translated and edited
by Salome Jakeli & Masho Naskidashvili 

READ MORE:

IERI RECOMMENDS:

Is success making George Keburia happy?

IS SUCCESS MAKING
GEORGE KEBURIA HAPPY?

by Salome Jakeli

For this interview we asked a self-taught designer & futuristic sunglasses creator aka George Keburia fifteen personal (spoiler: not too personal) questions in the hopes of getting to know him better. While we’ve already had a chance to find out about George Keburia brand in our exclusive  IERI video interview with the designer, so this time we wanted to get to know George Keburia as a person. Since handwriting is an oddly personal thing and our desire is to get to know him personally, it would only have been fair to ask him to handwrite us the answers… And he did!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE IN THE WORLD?

WHO IS YOUR BEST FRIEND?

ARE YOU CLOSE TO YOUR FAMILY?

HOW ARE YOU DIFFERENT NOW THAN YOU WERE, SAY, FIVE YEARS AGO?

HOW DO YOU IMAGINE YOUR OWN LIFE IN TEN YEARS?

DO YOU BELIEVE IN KARMA? 

WHAT DO YOU WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW ABOUT YOU?

WOULD YOU SAY THAT YOU ARE CONFIDENT IN YOURSELF? 

DO YOU BELIEVE IN GOD? 

WHAT ARE THE MOMENTS WHEN YOU FEEL THE MOST JOY?

IS SUCCESS MAKING YOU HAPPY?

DID YOU SURPRISE YOURSELF?

WHEN YOU WERE A CHILD, WHAT SEEMED BEAUTIFUL TO YOU? 

IF YOU WERE GOING TO DO AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL PROFILE, HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF?

NOW, WHAT’S THE FIRST THING YOU DO WHEN YOU WAKE UP IN THE MORNING?